New Poll Says Majority of Americans Trust Trump More Than Media During Coronavirus Crisis New Poll Says Majority of Americans Trust Trump More Than Media During Coronavirus Crisis

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New Poll Says Majority of Americans Trust Trump More Than Media During Coronavirus Crisis


The media has not been afraid to show their true colors during this coronavirus crisis.

They are too quick to criticize President Trump and too eager to praise communist China, even though it’s been shown that China most likely made the crisis worse than it could have been.

Perhaps this is why, according to a recent Monmouth University poll, Trump earned higher marks in his handling of the coronavirus outbreak than the mainstream media did.

Check it out:

According to Monmouth University:

The nation’s governors get better marks than the President for handling the COVID-19 outbreak, according to the Monmouth (“Mon-muth”University Poll. Still, Donald Trump receives a net positive rating for his actions around the pandemic and his overall job rating has improved slightly since last month. Federal health agencies garner better marks than either the president or Congress for dealing with the crisis, but reviews are more mixed for how the media and the American public as a whole have handled it. Most Americans report experiencing a major impact from the coronavirus situation, with one-third saying they have suffered a loss in income.

 More Americans say President Trump has done a good job (50%) rather than bad job (45%) dealing with the coronavirus outbreak. Governors, though, get even better ratings for handling the outbreak, with 72% of the public saying their state’s governor has done a good job to just 18% a bad job. Opinion of how Trump has dealt with the crisis is decidedly partisan, with the number saying he has done a good job ranging from 89% of Republicans to 48% of independents and 19% of Democrats. Public praise for the nations’ governors is much more bipartisan at 76% of Democrats, 73% of Republicans, and 67% of independents saying their governor has done a good job dealing with the situation.

The Western Journal had this to say about the poll:

If there’s one casualty of the coronavirus crisis that’s likely to carry forward, it’s the media’s credibility.

And rarely has a product for the public damaged itself more than the preening, pompous nitpickers of the national news who’ve been using a potential catastrophe to stroke their own egos and politically damage the president.

But the American people appear to be onto the game.

According to a Monmouth University poll released Monday, President Donald Trump is rated higher than the media when it comes to questions about who is responding to the crisis more responsibly.

Fifty percent of Americans say Trump has done a good job dealing with the outbreak versus 45 percent who say he’s done a bad job, the poll reported.

Meanwhile, 45 percent of those polled said the media had done a good job, versus 43 percent who said the media was doing a bad job.

Since the poll’s margin of error was 3.4 percent, it’s pretty clear that Trump has more credibility than the nation’s biased media — at least on a poll taken from March 18-22.

An exchange that took place Friday between Trump and NBC’s Peter Alexander was an excellent example of the situation.

The big headline, of course, was Trump telling Alexander “you’re a terrible reporter,” on national television — and that was the clip that dominated social media.

But for the many Americans who saw the run-up to Trump’s statement, who saw Alexander’s nattering, badgering questions that sounded more like an insolent teenager in a sex-ed class than a professional reporter on the nation’s biggest stage, Trump’s response was well deserved.


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