Media Ignores Dr. Fauci's "Of Course" I'd Prescribe Chloroquine Comments Media Ignores Dr. Fauci's "Of Course" I'd Prescribe Chloroquine Comments

Media Ignores Dr. Fauci’s “Of Course” I’d Prescribe Chloroquine Comments


Dr. Fauci has become one of the most recognizable faces on television during the COVID-19 pandmic.

President Trump has had Dr. Fauci alongside him at press briefings to go into detail on what medical researchers have learned about the virus as well as potential cures on the horizon.

After Trump touted the potential benefits of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, the media went into a frenzy.

Democrats and left wing media hosts have continuously sought to downplay the potential benefits that anti-malaria drugs may have against the novel coronavirus.

Some in the media have even claimed that President Trump and Dr. Fauci disagree on the issue.

However, on a WNTP-AM broadcast, Dr. Fauci said that "of course" he'd prescribe chloroquine.

Will the media give that statement the same breathless coverage?

Listen to Dr. Fauci's remarks for yourself on WNTP-AM below:

Dr. Fauci went on to defend President Trump.

Fauci said that President Trump's comments were made to give hope to the American people that the medical community is working quickly to discover and authorize a treatment.

Fauci also explained that his personal statements come from the perspective of a scientist, which is why his statements seemingly contradict the president's, especially when the media twists them out of context.

On the Western Journal, contributor Joe Saunders does a deep dive on Fauci's comments:

“As I’ve said many times, the data that indicate that are really anecdotal and not proven. What the president and others are saying is there is a possibility that it might work, and in order to give [people] some hope, let’s try it,” he said.

“However, I have said, and I continue to say, the only way you’re going to prove something … is by a controlled trial that gives you significant data.

“It could work, that’s a possibility, but as a scientist, purely as a scientist, I can say that the data are what we call anecdotal. … So we can’t make a statement, yet, ‘It’s working.’

“We can say, ‘Let’s try it, it’s might work.’ Nothing wrong with that. But make sure we try it under the appropriate conditions.”

That sounds an awful lot like what Trump said at Friday’s media briefing where he was baited by NBC’s Peter Alexander over his optimism about chloroquine treatment for the coronavirus.

Noting that the drug could be a “game-changer” in the crisis, the president said he was optimistic.

“I mean, there’s been some interesting things happened — and some good, very good things,” Trump said. “Let’s see what happens, we have nothing to lose. You know the expression, ‘What the hell do you have to lose?’”

Alexander disgraced himself on national television with his continued line of questioning, which prompted the president to eventually brand him a “terrible reporter.”

Liberals around the country disgraced themselves even more. Former CNN contributor Jacki Schechner published a Twitter post likening Trump’s answer to the barbaric human experiments conducted by the Adolf Hitler’s National Socialist regime. (To get an idea of how sick the liberal mindset really is, that tweet had received more than 1,200 “likes” as of Wednesday afternoon.)

But Fauci gave Stigall a different take. Asked point-blank whether he would be willing to prescribe it for a patient personally, as a physician, not as “the guy running the coronavirus task force right now,” his answer was unequivocal.

“Yeah, of course, particularly if people have no other option. You want to give them hope,” he said.

This is in stark contrast to how the media portrays President Trump and Dr. Fauci's relationship.

Instead of trying to create the narrative, the media should focus on reporting the facts!

Fauci has consistently touted Trump's willingness to listen to experts on the issue, even if he must factor in other variables before making a decision.

While it's too soon to reach any conclusions, the early results of clinical trials and testing is looking positive.

However, it's important to note that hydroxychloroquine should only be taken if prescribed by a doctor or as part of a clinical trial.

It is not recommended for Americans to attempt to self-medicate with these drugs.

NBC New York has more details on the ongoing experimental drug therapies:

In one small study, according to the CDC, it was reported that hydroxychloroquine alone or in combination with azithromycin reduced detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in upper respiratory tract specimens.

Currently, hydroxychloroquine is under investigation in clinical trials for SARS-CoV-2 infection, and treatment of patients with mild, moderate, and severe COVID-19, according to the CDC.

The main concerns of using either chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine is cardiotoxicity, especially prolonged QT syndrome, which is a heart rhythm condition that can cause fast, chaotic heartbeats. This concern is particularly more acute in patients with underlying health issues and immunosuppression, according to the CDC.

Because of these concerns, CDC urges caution when considering these drugs in patients with chronic medical conditions or those who are receiving medications that might interact and cause arrythmias -- problems with the heartbeat's rate or rhythm.

However, the agency notes that it has been reportedly well-tolerated in COVID-19 patients.

President Donald Trump touted the drug combination last week.

As the novel coronavirus continues to spread worldwide, we pray that our medical researchers and scientists are able to find a solution that will heal Americans and people all across the world.

Trials and experiments are being done this very moment to determine whether these anti-malaria drugs can help in the fight against COVID-19.

Time will tell!


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